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Feb
22
2016

7 Strategies for the Government Executive

By John Dillard

In my last post I wrote about the implications of accelerating compression, automation, and specialization of knowledge work. That post dealt with commercial organizations, but the imperative to act is as important, if not more important for government executives.

Don’t believe me? Well listen up: the US federal government spent roughly $308 billion – roughly equal to the nominal GDP of Denmark – on services contracts in 2012.

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Feb
11
2016

7 Ways to Prepare for the Future of Knowledge Work

By John Dillard

In this feed I’ve been writing about the importance of Microslices: the accelerating compression, automation, and specialization of knowledge work in general and professional services in particular. The question remains: what are the implications for executives right now? If you’re leading the owner of a company, or an executive who hires and/or pays for knowledge workers, there are some things that you can and should start doing differently.  

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Jan
28
2016

Five Insane Predictions about Knowledge Work

By John Dillard


Predictions are a dumb idea if you’re a writer. No matter how well written or justified, they will certainly be wrong.  Nonetheless, predictions are fun. Like any mental exercise, they force us to consider scenarios that, while far fetched, require consideration of alternatives otherwise lost to practicality. In that spirit, here are a few that I make in Microslices:

By 2030 (14 years from now):

  1. Humans will remain employed, but massively displaced. Despite the dire warnings of guys like Jaron Lanier, humans will remain employed. Humanity will not require a subsistence wage. AI is not the end of employment; like the industrial and information revolutions before it, new human careers will emerge that we can’t foresee.

  2. More than a trillion sensors will carpet the earth. Everything will have a sensor or be a sensor, making awareness of facts almost ubiquitous, and privacy elusive. This will be good for evidence based management, and bad for those who like to make decisions with their gut.

  3. In digital environments, machines will be indistinguishable from humans. The human ear will remain resilient and will continue to be able to detect audible AI, but you’ll never be able to tell whether your chat support desk is in the Philippines or in an Amazon server farm.

  4. Business and government leaders will not need professional advisors for things like root cause analysis and investment prioritization. They’ll ask their desk clock.

  5. Technology will begin to advise us not just on problems, but on how to use technology itself. In other words, we will seek advice from technology on technology, accelerating a virtuous cycle of innovation.

What do you think the world of knowledge work will be like in 2030?

Get your free copy of MICROSLICES now!

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Nov
12
2015

Yoi! This Platform has Crazy Chutzpah.

By John Dillard

It was a simple, yet significant, problem: a Fortune 100 company simply was not providing effective on-boarding for its new employees, which was causing it to lose said new employees. Rather than pursue the traditional solution of hiring an outside HR consultant, this company embraced advanced, automated data analysis and turned to a start-up called Yoi. Yoi provided real-time analysis of where the on-boarding process was falling short, and also created assignments for employees that would help them strengthen areas of weakness so that they would feel more comfortable in their job.

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Nov
05
2015

Why Your Understanding of Data is All Wrong

By John Dillard

Data. Data Science. Big Data. Data-Driven. Data-Centric.

Ok, we get it -- data is important. Unfortunately, the buzz-wording of data has obscured what it really is (and isn’t), what do with it, and why it matters.

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